I know it’s been a little while here since I last posted a video. I actually haven’t gone anywhere but I’ve just been really hard at work behind the scenes about MK-677, following the Real Science Athletics launch. So thanks a lot to everybody for the support on that, new subscribers or anybody who miss edit can click up at the top of the screen here to visit the new website, but everything settled now and back to regular content again. And today I want to talk a little bit about calf training.

And I want to explain to those lifters out there who, like myself, have naturally very thin and, kind of, stubborn calves, why you aren’t seeing any real noticeable calf gains. Now, the genetic component obviously plays a big role here. I’ve talked about this in previous videos. And, yeah, there’s no question that if you aren’t blessed with naturally muscular calves and if you have I’m just, kind of, a smaller lower leg structure in general with a long calf tendon that causes your calves to be shorter from top to bottom, yeah, there’s no question that it is gonna be harder to build them up significantly.

However, with the proper plan in place most people can still make some really solid improvements in their calf development given enough time. And the reason why most lifters with naturally thin calves just don’t see the gains they’re after in my view is actually pretty straight forward, and it’s because you’re just not calculating your calf training volume properly. See, what most people do when calculating their training volume is they take their large muscle groups and then they assign a weekly number of sets and reps to those muscle groups,and then they take their small muscle groups and they assign a weekly volume range to those muscles, and they say, okay, well the calves are a “small muscle group”, so they should be trained with the same workload as the other small muscle groups like the biceps, or the triceps, or the lateral delts, or whatever else.

But the problem with that approach is that unlike the calves all those smaller upper body muscles are getting a large amount of secondary stimulation during compound exercises,whereas outside of direct calf work your calves really aren’t being hit hard at all. Your biceps are being stimulated for growth during pull-ups, pull-downs, rows. Your triceps are hit hard on every single set of chest and shoulder pressing. Your delts are hit to some degree on pretty much every single upper body lift that you do in general.

And, yeah, there’s no question that if you aren’t blessed with naturally muscular calves and if you have I’m just, kind of, a smaller lower leg structure in general with a long calf tendon that causes your calves to be shorter from top to bottom, yeah, there’s no question that it is gonna be harder to build them up significantly. However, with the proper plan in place most people can still make some really solid improvements in their calf development given enough time. And the reason why most lifters with naturally thin calves just don’t see the gains they’re after in my view is actually pretty straight forward, and it’s because you’re just not calculating your calf training volume properly.

See, what most people do when calculating their training volume is they take their large muscle groups and then they assign a weekly number of sets and reps to those muscle groups,and then they take their small muscle groups and they assign a weekly volume range to those muscles, and they say, okay, well the calves are a “small muscle group”, so they should be trained with the same workload as the other small muscle groups like the biceps, or the triceps, or the lateral delts, or whatever else. But the problem with that approach is that unlike the calves all those smaller upper body muscles are getting a large amount of secondary stimulation during compound exercises,whereas outside of direct calf work your calves really aren’t being hit hard at all.

Your biceps are being stimulated for growth during pull-ups, pull-downs, rows. Your triceps are hit hard on every single set of chest and shoulder pressing. Your delts are hit to some degree on pretty much every single upper body lift that you do in general.

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